Modelling the predictors and outcomes of brand experience: evidence from the chained fast food brand / Rozita Naina Mohamed

Naina Mohamed, Rozita (2014) Modelling the predictors and outcomes of brand experience: evidence from the chained fast food brand / Rozita Naina Mohamed. In: The Doctoral Research Abstracts. IPSis Biannual Publication, 5 (5). Institute of Graduate Studies, UiTM, Shah Alam.

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Abstract

In today’s overcrowded and highly competitive marketplace, ‘Brand Experience’ (BE) can be the most privileged tool for differentiation. Customer’s feeling, emotion and interactions will contribute to the overall perception of the brand experience. Undoubtedly, it is critical to gain insights into the key drivers of ‘brand experience’ and subsequently ascertain its outcomes in order to design effective marketing strategies for market growth and perhaps business sustainability. The principal aim was to develop an integrative novelty model of brand experience and examine the predictors and outcomes of brand experiences of the four most prominent fast food brand share in Malaysia namely, Mc Donald’s, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Marrybrown and A & W. The study applies SOR Model (Mehrabian-Russell, 1974), and other related branding models to a sample of 450 adult respondents who reside in chosen urban areas in Malaysia.

Item Type: Book Section
Creators:
CreatorsEmail
Naina Mohamed, RozitaUNSPECIFIED
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > Branding (Marketing)
Divisions: Institut Pengajian Siswazah (IPSis) : Institute of Graduate Studies (IGS)
Series Name: IPSis Biannual Publication
Volume: 5
Number: 5
Item ID: 19288
Uncontrolled Keywords: Abstract; Abstract of thesis; Newsletter; Research information; Doctoral graduates; IPSis; IGS; UiTM; fast food brand
Last Modified: 12 Jun 2018 07:41
Depositing User: Staf Pendigitalan 2
URI: http://ir.uitm.edu.my/id/eprint/19288

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